AI and Faith Featured in The New York Times

“As we confront the question of what makes us human, let us not disregard the religions and spiritualities that make up our oldest kinds of knowledge. Whether we agree with them or not, they are our shared inheritance, part of the past, present and future of humankind.”

—Linda Kinstler, The New York Times, Sunday, July 18, 2021

 

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AI and Faith is a cross-spectrum consortium of faith communities and academic institutions. Its mission is to bring the fundamental values of the world’s major religions into the emerging debate on the ethical development of Artificial Intelligence and related technologies.

Faith communities, faith-related institutions, and universities in technology-centric regions like Seattle are home to many professionals, scientists, theologians, ethicists, teachers of religion, and other thought leaders who are stakeholders in the evolution of AI. AI and Faith exists as a channel for faith-based perspectives to help shape the development of AI in ways that are deeply ethical and life-affirming.

AI and Faith is also a research organization focused on better understanding the relationship between sacred texts and the millennia of additional commentary on ethics in everyday life, government, and business. We seek to better align faith-based wisdom to inform the dialog on the development in ethical AI.

We focus on how to ensure the flourishing of humanity in a world of technology while protecting and promoting:

 

The worth of human life and dignity of every individual

Societal justice and meaningful community

Liberty and choice

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“Ultimately, a global conversation about ethical principles for artificial intelligence will require an even bigger tent. There will need to be seats at the table not only for technologists, governments, NGOs, and educators, but for philosophers and representatives of the world’s many religions.” Brad Smith, President, Microsoft from his book Tools and Weapons: The Promise and the Peril of the Digital Age


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